Power of Presentation for Internet Marketers

Presentation is just as important for an Internet Marketer as it is for an offline marketer. However, many people neglect this, thinking that I can work in my underwear and still make loads of money. It may be true but think of how much more you could make if you pay a little bit more attention to your presentation.

If you have any question about the power of presentation look at the food in a restaurant. You want it because it looks good enough to eat. Go to a nightclub and you are attracted to the people that look good. You buy cars, homes and cloth because they look good or your going to look good in or with them. The way we present things tells us the value we place on it in the first place.

If we chose to display something in a sloppy manor we announce to the world that we do not believe in what we are doing. It does not matter what kind of product or service we have to sell if we do not believe in it, it will show through loud and clear. You need to believe in your product enough to care enough to present it in an appealing manor.

The key here is that your presentation needs to be visually appealing. You will not order a dish at a restaurant unless it looks good enough to eat. Why would you buy a product or service online unless it looked good enough to eat? Most people will come to a site and you have only a few seconds to get their attention and hold it.

The idea is to be able to present your message in such a way to get the visitors attention and keep it so they will be interested in looking at what you have to say. The attention getting mechanism must not over shadow what you are saying or doing. This means that when the visitor does leave your site they remember the product or service and not what got their attention.

This will allow them to recommend it to others because the product or service was memorable. This can be a fine line to walk and it happens all the time. There are product today in which you can remember the ad for a product but you have no clue what the product was that was being advertised. This could spell disaster for your product and your business in the long term.

You can use type fonts, color and shapes to catch someone’s attention. You can use images and perhaps even a little sound but don’t over do the sound. Too much or too loud will push people away just as fast as bad sound or a bad image. The idea is that you are making a first impression with a potential new customer and you need to make it a good one.

The image and the presentation should be a reflection of you and hoe you do things. The customer will be able to tell if the wording, images and other presentation features are contrived or forced. They will also be able to tell if it is an accurate reflection of you and the way they do things. You are setting yourself apart from anyone else selling your type of product because that is how you get business.

Negotiating a Business Contract? Consider the Other Party’s Interests

People in business are constantly engaged in negotiating: with existing and prospective customers; with suppliers and other vendors; and, with others within their own organizations. Those who are successful in business are quite often those who have developed the skill set necessary to become effective negotiators. Good negotiators recognize that a successful negotiation is about more than just making a deal – it is about making a good deal. Good deals are more apt to result when the parties are able to agree to a contractual arrangement that satisfies one or more of the interests of each of the parties.

Interests are the underlying needs and concerns which the business negotiator seeks to satisfy by means of a contractual relationship with another party. Interests are the underlying reasons why a business engages in a negotiation at all. Successful business negotiators approach a negotiation as a problem solving exercise in which the basic problem is devising a solution that satisfies one or more of the underlying interests of each of the parties. By contrast, less effective negotiators tend to approach business negotiations by focusing on the positions they intend to present for the other side’s consideration. The difference between positional and interest based bargaining is illustrated by the following example:

“Consider the story of two men quarreling in a library. One wants the window open and the other wants it shut. They bicker back and forth about how much to leave it open: a crack, halfway, three quarters of the way. No solution satisfies them both.

Enter the librarian. She asks one why he wants the window open: ‘To get some fresh air.’ She asks the other why he wants it closed: ‘To avoid the draft.’ After thinking a minute, she opens wide a window in the next room, bringing in fresh air without a draft.” Roger Fisher and William Ury, Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (1991), p. 40.

Each of the two men focused on their own positions, and entirely missed a solution that effectively reconciled their underlying interests. As the above example suggests, negotiating over positions tends to lock the negotiator into defending or advancing his/her position to the point that his/her own ego becomes identified with the position. As more attention is devoted to the position less attention is given to the parties’ underlying interests. Agreement becomes less likely and any agreement which results may be merely “splitting the difference” between the parties’ final positions instead of exploring a solution which might have achieved more for each side. That makes for an inefficient process in that both sides tend to begin with extreme positions and give ground slowly and reluctantly increasing the time and costs of reaching an agreement as well as the risk that no agreement is reached at all.

The ability to identify the other party’s interests in the course of the negotiation process can be critical to reaching a mutually beneficial contract relationship. The reality is that if the party with whom you are negotiating cannot satisfy its own interests in a deal with you, then it will either do a deal with someone else or go without. Knowing the other party’s interests will help you to determine what you have or what you can offer that is of value to that other party. That will enable you to craft a proposal that both meets the interests of the other side and makes good business sense for your side as well.

© 11/17/2015 Hunt & Associates, P.C. All rights reserved.

Learn to Be Funny – Jokes to Open a Presentation

An easy and simple way to immediately add humor to your presentation is to include it in your introduction. This way you can potentially have your audience laughing even before you set foot on stage, this is not a bad thing. Now, when I say you can use jokes to open a presentation you do not necessarily have to use a street joke.

If you are not clear on the term, a street joke is a joke you get told by a friend or work colleague in a social situation. Such as the “man walks into a bar…” type jokes. More often than not these do not have an authorship.

But you do not have to use those. You can simply create your own presentation introduction jokes, but harnessing your own sense of humor. Can you think of something humorous, and relevant to your presentation which the person introducing you can read out? Quick tip; if you do make sure it is appropriate for the environment you are speaking in.

Is there a way that you can find a witty quote, or inside joke that connects well with your presentation as well as with your audience?

You can use street jokes, but I would provide two warnings if you do so. The first is if you use a street joke I would edit it so that it was in my words and I would personalise it. Secondly, be very careful if you find a street joke online or in a book. There is a very high chance that someone else may be using the same joke. If they are on the same bill as you it could be dangerous. Or if you are the only speaker, you might have someone coming up to you afterwards and telling you that they had heard the joke before.

Also, many presenters waste valuable audience connection time by having their introduction packed with biographical information. You know the type, “our next speaker as an MBA, BBC and NBC…” who cares?

Remember that your audience is always going to be thinking: “what is in it for me?” So why not tell them right off the bat? Inform your audience exactly what they will get out of listening to you. What is their take away? Will they learn a specific set of tools? Are you giving them an action plan?

By telling them what they can expect to get out of your presentation before you even begin, you can help grab their interest before you even walk out in front of them. So not only are you connecting with your audience through the power of laughter by using jokes to open a presentation, but you are also relaying the benefits they will get.

The next step is using jokes to open a presentation once you are on the speaking platform. Again, you want to make it relevant to your content. You could also find a way to make it relevant to something that is immediately noticeable, like the backdrop. Be careful with this one though, mocking the backdrop or something else that you share the platform with, might seem as though you are biting the hand that feeds you.

You can also open and immediately connect with your audience by referring back to something that got a laugh by a previous speaker. Find a way to slightly re-phrase that person’s comment. Your audience will love you for it because it shows that you are in the moment, you are paying attention and your presentation is alive and fresh just for them.

Do not spend too long being funny in your opening though, remember you have to carry on and deliver your overall message. Unless of course, your whole speech is humorous then that is a whole other ballgame as you will want to continue being humorous.

Remember, if you say that you are going to provide them with definite take-ways, actually provide them with those take-aways. Do not fail to deliver on your promise. Always strive to over-deliver on your promise.